Dr. Michael McKenzie ’99 named dean of Appalachian’s Cratis D. Williams School of Graduate Studies

By Alex Jansen

Posted June 18, 2018 at 4:16 p.m.inShare

BOONE, N.C. — Dr. Michael “Mike” McKenzie ’99, interim associate provost and chief research officer at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU), will be the next dean of the Cratis D. Williams School of Graduate Studies at Appalachian State University. His appointment will become effective July 1.

“I look forward to working with Mike as he serves the entire campus community through the significant work of the Cratis D. Williams School of Graduate Studies. His extensive experience in a variety of areas and roles will help advance the school’s mission of supporting the academic and professional development of our graduate students.”

Dr. Darrell P. Kruger, Appalachian provost and executive vice chancellor

McKenzie replaces Dr. Max C. Poole, who served as dean of the graduate school since 2014 and retired in April.

“I look forward to working with Mike as he serves the entire campus community through the significant work of the Cratis D. Williams School of Graduate Studies,” said Dr. Darrell P. Kruger, provost and executive vice chancellor at Appalachian. “His extensive experience in a variety of areas and roles will help advance the school’s mission of supporting the academic and professional development of our graduate students.”

McKenzie has held the position of interim associate provost and chief research officer at WSSU since 2017. He is also professor of exercise science in WSSU’s School of Health Sciences, and has served in a number of other roles at the university, including associate dean for student research, chair of the exercise physiology department, director of the university’s honors/scholars program and director of undergraduate research.

Originally from Niagara Falls, New York, McKenzie moved to Raleigh for high school. He holds a Bachelor of Science in athletic training from Appalachian (1999) and a Master of Science in exercise physiology from the University of Florida. McKenzie earned his doctorate in exercise physiology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and completed his postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Maryland’s School of Medicine.

McKenzie will be responsible for administering graduate education at Appalachian, including oversight of graduate program review, analysis of curricula and monitoring of national trends in graduate education.

He also will facilitate other activities associated directly with graduate students, including recruitment, advising, commencement, student orientation, professional development, graduate teaching assistant training, faculty development, financial support for graduate students and scholarly activities.

About graduate education at Appalachian

Appalachian State University’s Cratis D. Williams School of Graduate Studies helps individuals reach the next level in their career advancement and preparedness. The graduate school offers 70 master's and certificate programs in a range of disciplines, including doctoral programs in education (Ed.D.) and psychology (Psy.D.). Classes are offered at the main campus in Boone as well as online and face-to-face at locations around northwestern North Carolina. The graduate school enrolls nearly 1,800 students. Learn more at https://graduate.appstate.edu.

About Appalachian State University

Appalachian State University, in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, prepares students to lead purposeful lives as global citizens who understand and engage their responsibilities in creating a sustainable future for all. The transformational Appalachian experience promotes a spirit of inclusion that brings people together in inspiring ways to acquire and create knowledge, to grow holistically, to act with passion and determination, and embrace diversity and difference. As one of 17 campuses in the University of North Carolina System, Appalachian enrolls about 19,000 students, has a low student-to-faculty ratio and offers more than 150 undergraduate and graduate majors.

Published: Jun 26, 2018 2:18pm

Tags: